Nany: “Can”, l’animateur de la radio chaîne 3 n’est plus
Nany

Nany: “Can”, l’animateur de la radio chaîne 3 n’est plus

ALGER- L'animateur de la radio nationale chaîne 3 Ahmed Nany Chellaoua, connu à l'antenne sous ses initiales "Can" pour ses émissions dédiées au châabi et au patrimoine musical, est décédé samedi à Alger à l'âge de 60 ans des suites d'une longue maladie, a-t-on appris auprès de la Radio nationale. "Can" était connu ces dernières années pour son émission musicale "Hier encore j'avais 20 ans", un programme interactif quotidien dédié à la musique des années 1960-1970 mais aussi aux grands noms du patrimoine musical algérien. Il était également co-animateur avec Sidali Driss de l'émission "El Qahwa Wel Latay", une émission hebdomadaire entièrement dédiée à la musique châabi et qui reçoit depuis un vingtaine d'années des orchestres entiers qui se produisaient en direct sur les ondes de la chaine III.   Véritable révélateur de jeunes talents du châabi, interprètes, musiciens et paroliers, cette émission a également permis à un grand nombre de…

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The Privilege of Play: Why the world’s game is a white game in the U.S.
The Privilege of Play: Why the world’s game is a white game in the U.S.

The Privilege of Play: Why the world’s game is a white game in the U.S.

  • Post category:Society / Sports

Henry BushnellYahoo SportsSep 22, 2020, 11:00 AM “The Privilege of Play” is a Yahoo Sports series examining the barriers minority groups face in reaching elite levels of competition in swimming, racecar driving, soccer and hockey. This is a story about opportunity. It begins in Columbia Heights, a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C., where elite soccer opportunities barely exist. But several years ago, on a lively field behind a public charter school, Precious Ogu clearly deserved one. She glided past helpless middle schoolers that afternoon, unaware of where the sport she loved could take her. She didn’t know much about high-level youth soccer; didn't know how to progress beyond after-school games. Fortunately, an onlooker did. Amir Lowery, executive director of the Open Goal Project, connected her with a travel program. Precious, the Black daughter of a Nigerian mother, showed up to try out. And she remembers being “shocked.” She’d grown up surrounded by…

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What You Lose When You Gain a Spouse
What You Lose When You Gain a Spouse

What You Lose When You Gain a Spouse

What if marriage is not the social good that so many believe and want it to be? Story by Mandy Len Catron In America today, it’s easy to believe that marriage is a social good—that our lives and our communities are better when more people get and stay married. There have, of course, been massive changes to the institution over the past few generations, leading the occasional cultural critic to ask: Is marriage becoming obsolete? But few of these people seem genuinely interested in the answer. More often the question functions as a kind of rhetorical sleight of hand, a way of stirring up moral panic about changing family values or speculating about whether society has become too cynical for love. In popular culture, the sentiment still prevails that marriage makes us happy and divorce leaves us lonely, and that never getting married at all is a fundamental failure of…

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The Vatican Removed 14 Books From the Bible In 1684 With No Real Explanation
The Vatican Removed 14 Books From the Bible In 1684 With No Real Explanation

The Vatican Removed 14 Books From the Bible In 1684 With No Real Explanation

- July 20, 2019 Typically when the Bible is brought up in conversation, what comes to mind is a source of truth that has not been tampered with. However, when this book was originally published it contained 80 books and current editions only have 66, and we have to wonder what exact purpose the removal of 14 books would serve?The Vatican Church or Roman catholic church has been associated with deception for ages. Their atrocities have ranged from genocide many centuries ago against the Cathars to child molestation is more recent years.The Bible was originally translated from Latin into English in 1611. This “original” Bible contained 80 books, including the Apocrypha, which means hidden.These Apocrypha booksmade up the end of the Old Testament, and included the following books:• 1 Esdras• 2 Esdras• Tobit• Judith• The rest of Esther• The Wisdom of Solomon• Ecclesiasticus• Baruch with the epistle Jeremiah• The Songs of the 3 Holy children•…

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What is the Einstein visa? And how did Melania Trump get one?
What is the Einstein visa

What is the Einstein visa? And how did Melania Trump get one?

By Joel Gunter BBC News 2 March 2018 Melania Trump obtained US citizenship on a visa reserved for immigrants with "extraordinary ability" and "sustained national and international acclaim", according to a report in the Washington Post. Nicknamed the "Einstein Visa", the EB-1 is in theory reserved for people who are highly acclaimed in their field - the government cites Pulitzer, Oscar, and Olympic winners as examples - as well as respected academic researchers and multinational executives. Mrs Trump began applying for the visa in 2000, when she was Melania Knauss, a Slovenian model working in New York and dating Donald Trump. She was approved in 2001, one of just five people from Slovenia to win the coveted visa that year, according to the Post. Becoming a citizen in 2006 gave her the right to sponsor her parents, Viktor and Amalija Knavs, who are now in the US and in the…

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The U.S. and U.K. Were the Two Best Prepared Nations to Tackle a Pandemic—What Went Wrong?
The U.S. and U.K. Were the Two Best Prepared Nations to Tackle a Pandemic

The U.S. and U.K. Were the Two Best Prepared Nations to Tackle a Pandemic—What Went Wrong?

By Gavin Yamey and Clare Wenham July 1, 2020 6:00 AM EDT Yamey is a physician and professor of global health and public policy at Duke University, where he directs the Center for Policy Impact in Global Health. Wenham is an assistant professor of global health policy at the London School of Economics, where she directs the master of science degree program in global health policy. On Oct. 24, 2019—45 days before the world’s first suspected case of COVID-19 was announced—a new “scorecard” was published called the Global Health Security Index. The scorecard ranked countries on how prepared they were to tackle a serious outbreak, based on a range of measures, including how quickly a country was likely to respond and how well its health care system would “treat the sick and protect health workers.” The U.S. was ranked first out of 195 nations, and the U.K. was ranked second.…

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The Looming Bank Collapse
The Looming Bank Collapse

The Looming Bank Collapse

The U.S. financial system could be on the cusp of calamity. This time, we might not be able to save it. Story by Frank Partnoy After months of living with the coronavirus pandemic, American citizens are well aware of the toll it has taken on the economy: broken supply chains, record unemployment, failing small businesses. All of these factors are serious and could mire the United States in a deep, prolonged recession. But there’s another threat to the economy, too. It lurks on the balance sheets of the big banks, and it could be cataclysmic. Imagine if, in addition to all the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic, you woke up one morning to find that the financial sector had collapsed. To hear more feature stories, get the Audm iPhone app. You may think that such a crisis is unlikely, with memories of the 2008 crash still so fresh. But banks learned…

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How to Make this Moment the Turning Point for Real Change
George Floyd

How to Make this Moment the Turning Point for Real Change

As millions of people across the country take to the streets and raise their voices in response to the killing of George Floyd and the ongoing problem of unequal justice, many people have reached out asking how we can sustain momentum to bring about real change. Ultimately, it’s going to be up to a new generation of activists to shape strategies that best fit the times. But I believe there are some basic lessons to draw from past efforts that are worth remembering. First, the waves of protests across the country represent a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system in the United States. The overwhelming majority of participants have been peaceful, courageous, responsible, and inspiring. They deserve our respect and support, not condemnation — something that police in cities like Camden and Flint have commendably understood. On the…

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Gavin Newsom Declares California a ‘Nation-State’
Gavin Newsom Declares California a ‘Nation-State’

Gavin Newsom Declares California a ‘Nation-State’

California this week declared its independence from the federal government’s feeble efforts to fight Covid-19 — and perhaps from a bit more. The consequences for the fight against the pandemic are almost certainly positive. The implications for the brewing civil war between Trumpism and America’s budding 21st-century majority, embodied by California’s multiracial liberal electorate, are less clear.

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That Discomfort You’re Feeling Is Grief

That Discomfort You’re Feeling Is Grief by Scott Berinato HBR Staff/d3sign/Getty Images We’ve made our coronavirus coverage free for all readers. To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Daily Alert newsletter. Some of the HBR edit staff met virtually the other day — a screen full of faces in a scene becoming more common everywhere. We talked about the content we’re commissioning in this harrowing time of a pandemic and how we can help people. But we also talked about how we were feeling. One colleague mentioned that what she felt was grief. Heads nodded in all the panes. If we can name it, perhaps we can manage it. We turned to David Kessler for ideas on how to do that. Kessler is the world’s foremost expert on grief. He co-wrote with Elisabeth Kübler-Ross On Grief and Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief…

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Visualizing the True Size of Africa
Visualizing the True Size of Africa

Visualizing the True Size of Africa

Published 3 days ago on February 19, 2020 ByJeff Desjardins Mapped: The True Size of Africa Take a look at any map, and it’s clear that the African continent is a big place. However, despite the common perception that Africa is a large landmass, it’s still one that is vastly underestimated by most casual map viewers. The reason for this is that the familiar Mercator map projection tends to distort our geographical view of the world in a crucial way — one that often leads to misconceptions about the relative sizes of both countries and continents. A Geographical Jigsaw Today’s infographic comes from Kai Krause and it shows the true size of Africa, as revealed by the borders of the countries that can fit within the continent’s shape. The African continent has a land area of 30.37 million sq km (11.7 million sq mi) — enough to fit in the…

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233 Politicians Just Voted to Steal Social Security’s $2.9 Trillion Surplus
233 Politicians Just Voted to Steal Social Security's $2.9 Trillion Surplus

233 Politicians Just Voted to Steal Social Security’s $2.9 Trillion Surplus

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 12, 2018Contact: Linda Benesch, lbenesch@socialsecurityworks.org Legislation That Would Surreptitiously Steal Social Security’s $2.9 Trillion Surplus Has Been Defeated – But 97% of Republicans Voted For It (Washington, DC) — The following is a statement from Nancy Altman, President of Social Security Works, in reaction to nearly every Republican member of the House of Representatives, as well as seven Democrats, voting for a Constitutional amendment requiring that all annual revenue and spending balance every year. The amendment failed to attain the two-thirds majority required to pass it into law: “Every pay period, starting with our first jobs, America’s workers contribute to Social Security. The program uses those funds to pay all benefits and related administrative costs. Social Security does not add even a penny to the deficit, as Republican President Ronald Reagan so clearly stated when he was president. When Social Security runs a surplus, Social Security holds the funds in trust.…

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Apple fined for slowing down old iPhones
Apple fined for slowing down old iPhones

Apple fined for slowing down old iPhones

7 February 2020 Apple has been fined 25 million euros (£21m, $27m) for deliberately slowing down older iPhone models without making it clear to consumers. The fine was imposed by France's competition and fraud watchdog DGCCRF, which said consumers were not warned. In 2017, Apple confirmed that it did slow down some iPhones, but said it only did so to "prolong the life" of the devices. Apple said in a statement that it had resolved the issue with the watchdog. Why does Apple slow down old iPhones? Many customers had long suspected that Apple slowed down older iPhones to encourage people to upgrade when a new one was released. In 2017, the company confirmed it did slow down some models as they aged, but not to encourage people to upgrade. It said the lithium-ion batteries in the devices became less capable of supplying peak current demands, as they aged over…

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The Lunatic Farmer – Loneliness
The Lunatic Farmer

The Lunatic Farmer – Loneliness

January 31, 2020             A new study highlighted in the Wall Street Journal says loneliness is up:  61 percent of Americans say they're lonely.              Additionally, the study found a direct relationship between social media and loneliness.  The more social media usage, the higher the loneliness.              But I thought we were better connected through our devices.  These kinds of findings make me shake my head and marvel.  In case you're just tuning in, Teresa and I have no TV in our house.  Neither of us has a smart phone.  We have flip phones.  I don't do texting--at all.  My cell phone does not work in our house.  Even cordless landlines are dicey in our house.              I'm not lonely.  Is it possible to have device addiction?  Or to have interest addiction--like if someone doesn't express interest in me every 30 minutes, then apparently the world doesn't think I'm worth attention?             …

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Panic Attacks and Anxiety Episodes Linked to Vitamin Deficiencies in Groundbreaking Study
Panic Attacks and Anxiety Episodes Linked to Vitamin Deficiencies in Groundbreaking Study

Panic Attacks and Anxiety Episodes Linked to Vitamin Deficiencies in Groundbreaking Study

With approximately 40 million adults across the United States experiencing anxiety each year, scientists and researchers have dedicated their careers to trying to better understand this condition. Despite this work, we are still somewhat unclear on what actually causes this condition to occur. Characterized by feelings of nervousness and restlessness, increased heart rate, hyperventilation, sweating, trembling, difficulty concentrating and uncontrolled worry, it has the ability to impact every area of one’s life. There are many theories regarding the root cause of the condition, including genetics, brain chemistry, environmental factors or other medical factors and/or disease, however, nothing has been proven definitively. Instead, the scientific community continues to explore these leads further in the hope of an answer. One small study out of Japan may provide an important insight into the connection between nutritional deficiencies and mental health, revealing that low levels of vitamin B6 and iron may actually trigger the…

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