D.C. Council gives final approval to Airbnb regulations

Property owners won’t be able to use secondary homes for short-term rentals under the new rules By Andrew Giambrone Nov 15, 2018, 11:54am EST D.C. residents who use Airbnb or similar booking services to rent out their homes will likely have to abide by new regulations starting next October, when they are set to go into effect. The policies represent the first time the city has charted comprehensive laws for short-term rental units—an effort that has sparked a fierce debate spanning roughly the past two years. District lawmakers on Tuesday unanimously green-lit rules for short-term rentals, after they had delayed a final vote on the rules last month. The legislation bans property owners from renting out any homes other than their primary residences for fewer than 30 days at a time, commonly done through platforms such as Airbnb and VRBO. It also restricts to 90 the total number of days…

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Emotional General Motors Workers Seen Wiping Away Tears After Company Lays Off 14,500 People

By Jack Phillips November 28, 2018 Updated: November 28, 2018 Photos this week show emotional General Motors workers in Ontario, Canada, wiping away tears after the company laid off more than 14,000 employees just days before the holidays. The firm made the announcement on Nov. 26, saying it will shutter seven plants in the United States and Canada. It said it plans to cut 15 percent of its workforce to save $6 billion and adapt to “challenging market conditions,” and it will abandon many car models. “I don’t know how I’m going to feed my family,” Matt Smith, a worker at an Ontario factory, said outside the plant, News.com.au reported. “It’s hard. It’s horrible.” Smith said his wife also works at the plant, adding they have an 11-month-old baby. Members of Unifor local 222 gather at the union hall before the press conference with union leaders in Oshawa, Ontario, on…

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What you need to know about vaccines, autism, and the hubbub over ‘Vaxxed’

By Rebecca Robbins March 31, 2016 A medical assistant prepares a vaccine at a Colorado clinic. John Moore/Getty Images The anti-vaccine documentary “Vaxxed” will premiere Friday in New York, giving critics a first look at a film that sparked a ferocious backlash in the scientific community. The film is directed by a discredited British researcher, Andrew Wakefield, known for promoting the debunked notion that vaccines are linked to autism. It had been set to premiere April 24 at the prestigious Tribeca Film Festival. But amid a storm of outrage, actor and festival cofounder Robert De Niro, yanked it from the schedule. Now, a small California distributor that had originally planned to distribute the film after the Tribeca premiere has hastily arranged Friday’s debut screenings. Here’s what you should know about the controversy: Who’s behind this film? One of the most scorned men in the medical world. Wakefield, who also co-wrote the film, helped launch and sustain an anti-vaccine movement that public health experts estimate is responsible for thousands of preventable…

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After outcry, D.C. commission backs down on censoring art

A display of Christopher Kardambikis's "Paper Cuts/Live" exhibit at Washington Project for the Arts. WPA stands to lose $112,700 in funding from the DCCAH by not signing the memorandum. (Washington Project for the Arts) By Peggy McGlone November 8 at 5:20 PM Responding to protests from Washington artists and arts leaders, the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities has reversed a controversial new measure to censor its grant recipients. On Monday, the city’s arts agency added sweeping language to already approved grants requiring that artists and arts organizations avoid producing work that could be considered lewd, vulgar or political or be at risk of losing their funds. The arts community protested, saying the amended contract infringed on their First Amendment rights. The DCCAH capitulated. “The DC Commission on Arts and Humanities believes deeply in the right to freedom of expression and would never seek to violate that right by…

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Kavanaugh Has Exposed the Savage Amorality of America’s Ruling Class

How the DC establishment has responded to his confirmation controversy tells us an awful lot. Brett Kavanaugh in 2009. Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty For decades, Brett Kavanaugh has traveled through the ranks of the conservative movement as smoothly as food slides down the gullet of a force-fed foie gras duck. An elite private high school, Yale, Yale Law School, a series of clerkships for conservative judges, a spot on Ken Starr's team during his investigation of Bill Clinton, a gig as a lawyer in George W. Bush's White House, and, thanks to Bush, a federal judgeship. When Donald Trump—or really, the right-wing Federalist Society—nominated Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court this summer, a fleet of shiny legal establishment types gushed over the pick, declaring him a fine legal mind and an upstanding citizen. One of Kavanaugh's old professors, a self-described Hillary Clinton supporter named Akhil Reed Amar, called him a…

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WATCH: Donald Trump’s Sexual Predator Friends

  This morning, the Senate Judiciary Committee will hear testimony from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford about the night she was sexually assaulted by Brett Kavanaugh, the judge nominated to the Supreme Court by a president who is a self-admitted sexual predator. She believed she was about to be raped and thought she might die. How did we end up here? How does a man with multiple, credible allegations of sexual assault make it this far, on the brink of a lifetime appointment to the nation's highest court? First of all, we've always been here. Forever. None of this is new. Women have had to suffer this since the beginning of time. And men have always had friends in high places and systems set up to make sure they've never had to face any consequences for their actions. The media, over the decades, have failed to confront this issue and have…

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What separation from parents does to children: ‘The effect is catastrophic’

  by William Wan June 18 Email the author This is what happens inside children when they are forcibly separated from their parents. Their heart rate goes up. Their body releases a flood of stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. Those stress hormones can start killing off dendrites — the little branches in brain cells that transmit mes­sages. In time, the stress can start killing off neurons and — especially in young children — wreaking dramatic and long-term damage, both psychologically and to the physical structure of the brain. “The effect is catastrophic,” said Charles Nelson, a pediatrics professor at Harvard Medical School. “There’s so much research on this that if people paid attention at all to the science, they would never do this.” That research on child-parent separation is driving pediatricians, psychologists and other health experts to vehemently oppose the Trump administration’s new border crossing policy, which has…

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