IDEO’s Tim Brown and the secret to creating something from nothing

IDEO's CEO explains where his best ideas come from, and how design helps shape them. The ability to recognize and develop good ideas is often the superpower that differentiates the merely employed from the uber successful at work. So is there a formula for how to do it? This week, I discuss this and more with Tim Brown. Having spent nearly two decades running the design firm IDEO, he's in the business of helping people and companies come up with creative ideas. Then, Caroline Fairchild interviews Heather Hartnett, who founded and runs the startup studio Human Ventures. LISTEN TO THE EPISODE HERE. JESSI HEMPEL: From the editorial team at LinkedIn, I’m Jessi Hempel. And this...is Hello Monday--a show where I investigate how we’re changing the nature of work, and how that work is changing us. When we look back at the stories of how the greatest companies are founded, they…

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Doctors Explain How Hiking Can Actually Change Our Brains

While it may seem obvious that a good hike through a forest or up a mountain can cleanse your mind, body, and soul, science is now discovering that hiking can actually change your brain… for the better! Hiking In Nature Can Stop Negative, Obsessive Thoughts Aside from the almost instant feeling of calm and contentment that accompanies time outdoors, hiking in nature can reduce rumination. Many of us often find ourselves consumed by negative thoughts, which takes us out of the enjoyment of the moment at best and leads us down a path to depression and anxiety at worst. But a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that spending time in nature decreases these obsessive, negative thoughts by a significant margin. To conduct this study, researchers compared the reported rumination of participants who hiked through either an urban or a natural environment. They found those who walked for 90 minutes in a…

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Alpha Testing Vs Beta Testing: What’s the Difference?

What is Alpha Testing? Alpha testing is a type of acceptance testing; performed to identify all possible issues/bugs before releasing the product to everyday users or the public. The focus of this testing is to simulate real users by using a black box and white box techniques. The aim is to carry out the tasks that a typical user might perform. Alpha testing is carried out in a lab environment and usually, the testers are internal employees of the organization. To put it as simple as possible, this kind of testing is called alpha only because it is done early on, near the end of the development of the software, and before beta testing. What is Beta Testing? Beta Testing of a product is performed by "real users" of the software application in a "real environment" and can be considered as a form of external User Acceptance Testing.  Beta version…

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Smartphone screens find their size sweet spot

Natasha Lomas@riptari / 2 years ago The joke in the smartphone space in years past was how screens just kept getting bigger — stretching palms and making you look ridiculous when held up to the head to talk. How times change. Talking into phones? Why, how 2005 of you! Phablets have long been the new normal as the telephone icon lost out in the war to capture our attention via finger-flicking touchscreen fun — losing out to all the other apps offering more visual ways to be entertained and/or communicate, be it by text, selfie lens or silly GIF. Apple, a laggard at inflating smartphone screen size, has remained something of a reluctant participant in this ‘bigger is better’ logic. Evident in its tortured sloganizing for its very first phablet, the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus — which it launched in 2014 and stuck next to the words: “bigger than bigger”. The…

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People Laughed When This Philly Lawyer Sued Led Zeppelin. Nobody’s Laughing Now.

Philadelphia-area attorney Francis Malofiy. Photograph by Bryan Sheffield. The fact that Philadelphia barrister Francis Alexander Malofiy, Esquire, is suing Led Zeppelin over the authorship of “Stairway to Heaven” is, by any objective measure, only the fourth most interesting thing about him. Unfortunately for the reader, and the purposes of this story, the first, second and third most interesting things about Malofiy are bound and gagged in nondisclosure agreements, those legalistic dungeons where the First Amendment goes to die. So let’s start with number four and work our way backward. At the risk of stating the obvious, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, let the record show that “Stairway to Heaven” is arguably the most famous song in all of rock-and-roll, perhaps in all of popular music. It’s also one of the most lucrative — it’s estimated that the song has netted north of $500 million in sales and royalties since…

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Why is Christmas Day on the 25th December?

Christmas is celebrated to remember the birth of of Jesus Christ, who Christians believe is the Son of God. The name 'Christmas' comes from the Mass of Christ (or Jesus). A Mass service (which is sometimes called Communion or Eucharist) is where Christians remember that Jesus died for us and then came back to life. The 'Christ-Mass' service was the only one that was allowed to take place after sunset (and before sunrise the next day), so people had it at Midnight! So we get the name Christ-Mass, shortened to Christmas. Christmas is now celebrated by people around the world, whether they are Christians or not. It's a time when family and friends come together and remember the good things they have. People, and especially children, also like Christmas as it's a time when you give and receive presents! The Date of Christmas No one knows the real birthday of…

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The Yamas & One-Night Stands: A Yogi Perspective on Sex

  I’ve always been the girl who felt uncomfortable with one-night stands. But being a single, adult female, I quickly learned that my standards of needing a relationship before sex were, well, old-school. Not putting out within the first three dates is a guaranteed way to not hear back from a potential mate. Instead of giving into society’s new norm of casual sex, I found another way to feel fulfilled and still play the game of adult dating. Now, sometimes casual sex is great. (Okay, a lot of the time.) But dating in my early 20s is a scary, muddy puddle that I’m supposed to just know how to swim. Naturally. After a few bad fish, I had to ask myself, “How can I get what I want and still make sure I leave the other person better than I found them and without compromising my true feelings?” As a…

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Emotional General Motors Workers Seen Wiping Away Tears After Company Lays Off 14,500 People

By Jack Phillips November 28, 2018 Updated: November 28, 2018 Photos this week show emotional General Motors workers in Ontario, Canada, wiping away tears after the company laid off more than 14,000 employees just days before the holidays. The firm made the announcement on Nov. 26, saying it will shutter seven plants in the United States and Canada. It said it plans to cut 15 percent of its workforce to save $6 billion and adapt to “challenging market conditions,” and it will abandon many car models. “I don’t know how I’m going to feed my family,” Matt Smith, a worker at an Ontario factory, said outside the plant, News.com.au reported. “It’s hard. It’s horrible.” Smith said his wife also works at the plant, adding they have an 11-month-old baby. Members of Unifor local 222 gather at the union hall before the press conference with union leaders in Oshawa, Ontario, on…

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What you need to know about vaccines, autism, and the hubbub over ‘Vaxxed’

By Rebecca Robbins March 31, 2016 A medical assistant prepares a vaccine at a Colorado clinic. John Moore/Getty Images The anti-vaccine documentary “Vaxxed” will premiere Friday in New York, giving critics a first look at a film that sparked a ferocious backlash in the scientific community. The film is directed by a discredited British researcher, Andrew Wakefield, known for promoting the debunked notion that vaccines are linked to autism. It had been set to premiere April 24 at the prestigious Tribeca Film Festival. But amid a storm of outrage, actor and festival cofounder Robert De Niro, yanked it from the schedule. Now, a small California distributor that had originally planned to distribute the film after the Tribeca premiere has hastily arranged Friday’s debut screenings. Here’s what you should know about the controversy: Who’s behind this film? One of the most scorned men in the medical world. Wakefield, who also co-wrote the film, helped launch and sustain an anti-vaccine movement that public health experts estimate is responsible for thousands of preventable…

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After outcry, D.C. commission backs down on censoring art

A display of Christopher Kardambikis's "Paper Cuts/Live" exhibit at Washington Project for the Arts. WPA stands to lose $112,700 in funding from the DCCAH by not signing the memorandum. (Washington Project for the Arts) By Peggy McGlone November 8 at 5:20 PM Responding to protests from Washington artists and arts leaders, the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities has reversed a controversial new measure to censor its grant recipients. On Monday, the city’s arts agency added sweeping language to already approved grants requiring that artists and arts organizations avoid producing work that could be considered lewd, vulgar or political or be at risk of losing their funds. The arts community protested, saying the amended contract infringed on their First Amendment rights. The DCCAH capitulated. “The DC Commission on Arts and Humanities believes deeply in the right to freedom of expression and would never seek to violate that right by…

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15 Logical Fallacies You Should Know Before Getting Into a Debate

By David Ferrer A logical fallacy is an error in reasoning common enough to warrant a fancy name. Knowing how to spot and identify fallacies is a priceless skill. It can save you time, money, and personal dignity. Formal fallacies are breakdowns in how you say something, the ideas are ordered wrong somehow. Their form is wrong. Informal fallacies, like the ones below, have to do with what you are saying (the “content” of an argument). The ideas might be arranged right, but something you said isn’t quite right. The content is wrong. Here’s a list of the 15 informal fallacies you are most likely to encounter in discussion and debate. 1. Ad Hominem Fallacy When people think of “arguments,” often their first thought is of shouting matches riddled with personal attacks. Ironically, personal attacks run contrary to rational arguments. In logic and rhetoric, personal attacks are called ad hominems.…

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Why You Should Pose Nude

Why You Should Pose Nude Modeling Katja Gee I was warned about nude modeling on my very first shoot. The photographer I was working with told me in serious tones that she would never ask me to pose nude—and to be wary of any photographer that did. According to her, anyone who wanted me to disrobe was a predator and a pervert. The warnings didn’t stop there. As I did more research into modeling, I read countless articles that cautioned against posing nude, especially for new models. The pictures would be on the Internet forever, the authors warned, and could ruin future job opportunities. Besides, what would your mother think if she found out? Model: Katja Gee; Photographer: Art Silva To an extent, these warnings hold water. (Although for the record, none of my art nude photographers have ever been predatory, and my mother loves my work). It’s true that the images will be around forever. If you…

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Kavanaugh Has Exposed the Savage Amorality of America’s Ruling Class

How the DC establishment has responded to his confirmation controversy tells us an awful lot. Brett Kavanaugh in 2009. Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty For decades, Brett Kavanaugh has traveled through the ranks of the conservative movement as smoothly as food slides down the gullet of a force-fed foie gras duck. An elite private high school, Yale, Yale Law School, a series of clerkships for conservative judges, a spot on Ken Starr's team during his investigation of Bill Clinton, a gig as a lawyer in George W. Bush's White House, and, thanks to Bush, a federal judgeship. When Donald Trump—or really, the right-wing Federalist Society—nominated Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court this summer, a fleet of shiny legal establishment types gushed over the pick, declaring him a fine legal mind and an upstanding citizen. One of Kavanaugh's old professors, a self-described Hillary Clinton supporter named Akhil Reed Amar, called him a…

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Cats Are Actually Nice, Scientists Find

  Sorry, haters. Let me tell you about my handsome son, Mizue. He's a cat. He cuddles up beside me and pushes his little furry head against me when he wants to be petted. He purrs and rubs up on everyone he meets. He's the best dude, is what I'm saying here, and I am goddamn sick of people saying that cats aren't nice. Cats are nice. But don't take my word for it. Thanks to new research from Oregon State University, published on Friday in Behavioural Processes, there is scientific evidence that cats are, according to empirical study, nice. In fact, the study concluded, cats like interacting with humans more than they like eating food. Let that sink in: more than food. I don't like anybody more than food. The motivation for the study was to apply cognitive tests that have already be tried out on dogs and tortoises…

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METALLICA Breaks Revenue Records At Grand Forks, North Dakota’s Alerus Center

  According to the Grand Forks Herald, METALLICA's September 8 concert at the Alerus Center in Grand Forks, North Dakota broke records for ticket revenue and other sales. The event, which drew nearly 17,000 fans as part of the band's "WorldWired" tour, resulted in the highest-grossing ticket sales in the building's history, said Anna Rosburg, Alerus Center general manager. The stadium holds 21,000. It also broke highest-grossing records for food and beverage sales, merchandise sales, and partnership revenues for one show since the Alerus opened in February 2001, Rosburg said. Country music singer George Strait holds the record for highest attendance at an Alerus Center concert, having drawn about 19,500 for a February 2013 performance. "We did not break the [attendance] record [with the METALLICA concert, but had an excellent turnout and we appreciate the community's support in this exciting event," said Rosburg. Earlier in the year, METALLICA landed on…

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