Coloring Book Celebrates Mathematical Beauty of Nature with Hand-Drawn Golden Ratio Illustrations

By Kristine Mitchell on April 1, 2016 Rafael Araujo’s hand-drawn Golden Ratio illustrations are a beautiful fusion of art with science. For the past 40 years, the Venezuelan architect and illustrator has been perfecting his amazing drawings that are all connected by this common theme. Armed with nothing but a pencil, compass, ruler, and protractor he creates drawings that depict the mathematical brilliance of the natural world, and has recently begun to compile renditions of his best work into an adult coloring book that seeks to reconnect humans with nature. Araujo’s illustrations revolve around intelligent patterns of growth that are ruled by the Golden Ratio. This special number, commonly annotated with the Greek letter Phi (?), is equal to 1.618 and can be seen in all sorts of natural spirals, sequences, and proportions. “Phyllotaxis” is the name given for the tendency of organic things to grow in spiral patterns and…

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Two Artists Set Sail in a Pair of Floating Art and Photography Studios

By Kelly Richman-Abdou on February 15, 2018 Today, many creatives opt to abandon the confines of traditional workspaces in order to produce work on-the-go. From pop-up art studios to portable photography labs, this trend has resulted in both an abundance of experimental spaces and a surge in new technologies. Taking both of these approaches on board, artists Claudius Schulze and Maciej Markowiczhave created 2BOATS, a “floating photographic platform” that puts a creative twist on travel. The 2BOATS project revolves around a unique pair of water vessels. Intended to house the artists as they travel around Europe, each boat is much more than meets the eye. The first was dreamt up by Schulze and resembles a rustic houseboat. It serves as a hammock-equipped hub for artists to discuss “vision, formation, creation and the environment,” hold workshops, and view Schulze’s eclectic body of work. The second boat, Obscuraboat, was designed by Markowicz. Known as a “moving camera,” this…

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Artist Paints Creatures She Sees Around Her Due To Pareidolia (34 Pics)

By​ Hidreley Do you remember how you used to look at the clouds in the sky as a child and your imagination projected animals and various scenes of life? This phenomenon is called Pareidolia, which scientifically means the tendency to perceive a specific, and in a lot of cases meaningful images in completely random or ambiguous visual patterns (here you can find a list of 50 Times People Experienced Pareidolia In The Most Unexpected Places). Even though this phenomenon is more common among children, some people retain the ability to see this in their adulthood, perceiving a pattern that isn't actually there. Their brains form images from details of real objects. For example, when these people see a cloud that makes them think of a cute kitty. Or if they look at the carpet, its shape might perhaps form a battlefield for them. However, many artists who experience this phenomenon…

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We’re Not Gluten Intolerant, We’re Glyphosate Intolerant

Study blames Roundup herbicide for gluten intolerance and celiac disease epidemic “Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it,” researchers wrote in a meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies. “Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic,” they add. The study, published in the journal Interdisciplinary Toxicology in 2013, was completely ignored by the media except for Mother Earth News and The Healthy Home Economist. Now that glyphosate is getting the attention it deserves, being named as the culprit in a $280 million cancer lawsuit and labeled as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization and the state of California, it may be time to look at the chemical’s role in a related disease: The symptoms…

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What is the revenue generation model for DuckDuckGo?

Gabriel Weinberg, CEO & Founder at DuckDuckGo.com (2008-present)Updated Jun 14 2018 · Author has 94 answers and 406.5m answer views DuckDuckGo has been a profitable company since 2014 without storing or sharing any personal information on people using our search engine. As we like to say, what you search on DuckDuckGo is private, even from us! We’re proud to have a business model for a web-based business that’s profitable without making your personal information the product. I’m happy to tell you all about how we make it work (and how other companies can, too). Though first, if you’re not familiar with DuckDuckGo, we are an Internet privacy company that empowers you to seamlessly take control of your personal information online, without any tradeoffs. We operate a search engine alternative to Google at http://duckduckgo.com, and offer additional apps and extensions to protect you from Google, Facebook and other trackers, no matter…

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Thriving Garden in Sealed Bottle Hasn’t Been Watered in Over 40 Years

By Jenny Zhang on April 9, 2014 When David Latimer planted a seed in a glass bottle on Easter Sunday of 1960 out of pure curiosity, he had no idea that it would flourish into a mass of greenery that would thrive untouched for several decades. Now, over half a century later, the sealed bottle garden is still growing as vigorously as ever, filling the bottle entirely with lush plant life, despite the fact that the last time Latimer watered it was in 1972. After initially pouring some compost into the globular bottle, Latimer used a wire to carefully lower in a spiderworts seeding, and then added a pint of water to the mix. The bottle was sealed and placed in a sunny corner, and the magic of photosynthesis took over from there. Besides a single watering in 1972, the bottle garden has been completely cut off from fresh water…

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Doctors Explain How Hiking Can Actually Change Our Brains

While it may seem obvious that a good hike through a forest or up a mountain can cleanse your mind, body, and soul, science is now discovering that hiking can actually change your brain… for the better! Hiking In Nature Can Stop Negative, Obsessive Thoughts Aside from the almost instant feeling of calm and contentment that accompanies time outdoors, hiking in nature can reduce rumination. Many of us often find ourselves consumed by negative thoughts, which takes us out of the enjoyment of the moment at best and leads us down a path to depression and anxiety at worst. But a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that spending time in nature decreases these obsessive, negative thoughts by a significant margin. To conduct this study, researchers compared the reported rumination of participants who hiked through either an urban or a natural environment. They found those who walked for 90 minutes in a…

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Canadians! More No-Waste Grocery Stores Are Coming to a City Near You

And the trend doesn’t just apply to grocery stores. And the trend doesn’t just apply to grocery stores. The Soap Dispensary and Kitchen Staples in Vancouver, for instance, sells bulk and packaging-free beauty and household products, as well as food. This is a welcomed trend for environmentally-savvy consumers. “We’ve got a massive plastic packaging problem,” Barb Hetherington, a board member for Zero Waste Canada, told Global Citizen. “We’ve got so much packaging in the world that our recycling systems can’t handle it.” The average person in North America or Western Europe consumes about 100 kilograms of plastic, and the bulk of that is due to packaging, according to Zero Waste Canada. Related Stories June 18, 2018 New Toronto Grocery Store Lets Its Customers Pay What They Can Hetherington argues that the zero-waste shopping experience not only reduces the amount of packaging that has to be manufactured and recycled, but because…

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Doing Dishes Is the Worst

Photo by: Mardis Coers / Getty Every day, they slowly accumulate. Plates covered in sauces and crumbs. Bowls with a fine layer of sticky who-knows-what. Forks, knives, and spoons all gummed with bits of this and that. At the end of a long day of work, cooking, cleaning, and, for many, negotiating with small children, a couple has to face the big question: Who is going to do the dishes? A report from the Council of Contemporary Families (CCF), a nonprofit that studies family dynamics, suggests that the answer to that question can have a significant impact on the health and longevity of a relationship. The study examined a variety of different household tasks—including shopping, laundry, and housecleaning, and found that, for women in heterosexual relationships, it’s more important to share the responsibility of doing the dishes than any other chore. Women who wash the vast majority of the dishes…

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Billionaire Musk releases all Tesla patents to help save the Earth

Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Shanghai's Mayor Ying Yong attend the Tesla Shanghai Gigafactory groundbreaking ceremony in Shanghai, China Jan. 7, 2019. Aly Song, Reuters SAN FRANCISCO - Elon Musk announced Thursday he had released all of the electric carmaker Tesla's patents, as part of an effort to fight climate change. In a blog post, the colorful billionaire founder of Tesla promised the company "will not initiate patent lawsuits against anyone who, in good faith, wants to use our technology." It was a remarkable move in an industry where the smallest idea or seed of invention is carefully guarded to protect its monetary value.  And it in fact came on the same day US prosecutors charged a Chinese national with stealing secrets from Apple's self-driving vehicle project. "Tesla Motors was created to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport," Musk said. "If we clear a path to the creation of compelling…

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Alpha Testing Vs Beta Testing: What’s the Difference?

What is Alpha Testing? Alpha testing is a type of acceptance testing; performed to identify all possible issues/bugs before releasing the product to everyday users or the public. The focus of this testing is to simulate real users by using a black box and white box techniques. The aim is to carry out the tasks that a typical user might perform. Alpha testing is carried out in a lab environment and usually, the testers are internal employees of the organization. To put it as simple as possible, this kind of testing is called alpha only because it is done early on, near the end of the development of the software, and before beta testing. What is Beta Testing? Beta Testing of a product is performed by "real users" of the software application in a "real environment" and can be considered as a form of external User Acceptance Testing.  Beta version…

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Smartphone screens find their size sweet spot

Natasha Lomas@riptari / 2 years ago The joke in the smartphone space in years past was how screens just kept getting bigger — stretching palms and making you look ridiculous when held up to the head to talk. How times change. Talking into phones? Why, how 2005 of you! Phablets have long been the new normal as the telephone icon lost out in the war to capture our attention via finger-flicking touchscreen fun — losing out to all the other apps offering more visual ways to be entertained and/or communicate, be it by text, selfie lens or silly GIF. Apple, a laggard at inflating smartphone screen size, has remained something of a reluctant participant in this ‘bigger is better’ logic. Evident in its tortured sloganizing for its very first phablet, the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus — which it launched in 2014 and stuck next to the words: “bigger than bigger”. The…

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People Laughed When This Philly Lawyer Sued Led Zeppelin. Nobody’s Laughing Now.

Philadelphia-area attorney Francis Malofiy. Photograph by Bryan Sheffield. The fact that Philadelphia barrister Francis Alexander Malofiy, Esquire, is suing Led Zeppelin over the authorship of “Stairway to Heaven” is, by any objective measure, only the fourth most interesting thing about him. Unfortunately for the reader, and the purposes of this story, the first, second and third most interesting things about Malofiy are bound and gagged in nondisclosure agreements, those legalistic dungeons where the First Amendment goes to die. So let’s start with number four and work our way backward. At the risk of stating the obvious, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, let the record show that “Stairway to Heaven” is arguably the most famous song in all of rock-and-roll, perhaps in all of popular music. It’s also one of the most lucrative — it’s estimated that the song has netted north of $500 million in sales and royalties since…

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Being a Good American Kestrel Dad Comes at a Cost

Our smallest falcon, not much bigger than a robin, the American Kestrel ranges from Alaska to Argentina. Here in North America, its population has declined, and the American Kestrel Partnership—a coalition with strong Audubon support—is working to ensure its future survival. But for the moment the species is still widespread, a fairly familiar sight on roadside wires from coast to coast. Birders soon learn to tell the sexes of kestrels apart, even at highway speeds. Females are slightly larger than males (as with most birds of prey), but more obvious are color differences: females have reddish brown wings and tail with many black bars, while on males the tail is mostly unmarked reddish brown and the wings are blue-gray. This is true even on the youngest birds, as soon as their feathers start developing in the nest. Years ago when I lived in Tucson, a friend of mine often talked…

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What’s The Difference Between Frontend And Backend?

If you’ve just started learning web development, you’ll probably have heard a lot of talk about frontend and backend programming. But what exactly do we mean by this? If you’re a beginner in the field, it can be hard to know not only which is which, but also what is covered by one or the other. While frontend and backend development are certainly distinct from one another, they’re also like two sides of the same coin. A website’s functionality relies on each side communicating and operating effectively with the other as a single unit. Is one more important than the other? Nope. They both play very important roles in web development. So where should we start? Let’s flip a coin. Struggling to become a web developer? Click here to take our free 7-Day Web Development Course Introducing Frontend Development The frontend of a website is what you see and interact…

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